LAPD called to the Grove after fans storm One Direction screening

Liam Payne, left, Louis Tomlinson, Zayn Malik, Harry Styles and Niall Horan perform at a concert featured in "One Direction: This Is Us." (Sony Pictures)
August 3, 2013, 3:22 p.m.
"This Is Us," the upcoming One Direction documentary, follows the boy band on a world tour as they incite millions of teenage girls into frenzy.
So perhaps it shouldn't come as a surprise that an advance screening of the film, held at the Grove's Pacific Theatres on Saturday morning, created pandemonium at the outdoor shopping mall.
Things began calmly enough. Fans who had obtained free tickets on gofobo.com lined up outside TopShop. The event was first-come, first-serve, but even with hundreds in line, most remained hopeful they would get in. The first 100 patrons -- some of whom said they had arrived at 3:45 a.m. -- were admitted to the theater and surrendered their cellphones to theater staffers and submitted to brief security checks. 
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The screening was set to begin at 10 a.m., but 15 minutes after that time, there were still empty seats in the auditorium. That's when a frenzied usher began yelling at the audience to stay calm, alerting everyone that fans outside were rushing the theater. He said the police had been called, and requested any staffers go outside to help him deal. Sports betting is an exercise of predicting sports activities effects by building a wager on the end result of a sporting occasion. Maybe far more than other types of gambling, the legality and standard acceptance of these sports activities betting varies from country to nation. The pioneer in gambling of all varieties, specifically horses, greyhounds and sports activities has been the United kingdom. Nevertheless, because 2002 is staying carried out all the expansion of virtual betting houses, focusing on sports betting, which is coming to all European and American countries. A sample of this growth can be observed in the detail of that sports betting is the recent sponsor of Genuine Madrid.

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with the masses.
Still, it was unclear how serious the threat was. Many in the crowd began laughing. Was this some sort of prank? Were Niall Horan, Zayn Malik, Liam Payne, Louis Tomlinson and Harry Styles actually about to surprise the audience? (Sadly, no.)
Shortly after the usher's warning, a trailer for "The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones" began to roll and the crowd settled into their seats. Meanwhile, chaos was unfolding just outside the theater doors.
Just as Lizette Van Patten, her 13-year-old daughter and a 14-year-old friend were about to enter the theater, hundreds of mostly young female fans who had been turned away burst through the theater entrance.
“They charged and went straight past the ticket takers for the doors of the actual theater screaming, ‘Let us in! Let us in!’” recalled the 40-year-old San Pedro resident. “It took about a half an hour before a police car came with two policemen in it. They started palming kids down and shoving them outside.”
PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times

A Los Angeles Police Department spokesman did not immediately return a request for comment.

Allysa Mae De Guzman, 16, was part of the mob. She said that when she and her friends were told they wouldn’t be able to see the movie, they all began running toward the theater anyway.
“When I got inside, the red ropes that block the entrance to the theater were on the floor,” she said. “It was pretty scary because people were tripping on the floor and pushing and stuff like that.”
Van Patten said her daughter was so upset she didn’t get to see the movie that she left the Grove with mascara streaks running down her face.
“I’ve been to plenty of premieres and have seen people go crazy over Johnny Depp and Tom Cruise,” she said. “But nothing like this. Now I’m really convinced that One Direction is like the Beatles of this generation.”

ALSO:
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5 things we learned from One Direction's 'Best Song Ever' video

One Direction's 'Best Song Ever' video: 22 million views comaprador de apuestas in two days

amy.kaufman@latimes.com

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Copyright © 2013, Los Angeles Times
Self esteem can prevent girls like this from losing control. 
Apparently these dumb giurls don't realize these dudes are gay. 
Er, is this one of those "bands" concocted by some cigar-chomping fatty in Florida? Do they play instruments? Have they been appearing in small clubs for several years, developing their musicianship, their act?? Do they write their own songs? Just askin'.
Every show. Every game. Every ticket.
Be the first on your street to see the show.
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LAPD called to the Grove after fans storm One Direction screening

Liam Payne, left, Louis Tomlinson, Zayn Malik, Harry Styles and Niall Horan perform at a concert featured in "One Direction: This Is Us." (Sony Pictures)
August 3, 2013, 3:22 p.m.
"This Is Us," the upcoming One Direction documentary, follows the boy band on a world tour as they incite millions of teenage girls into frenzy.
So perhaps it shouldn't come as a surprise that an advance screening of the film, held at the Grove's Pacific Theatres on Saturday morning, created pandemonium at the outdoor shopping mall.
Things began calmly enough. Fans who had obtained free tickets on gofobo.com lined up outside TopShop. The event was first-come, first-serve, but even with hundreds in line, most remained hopeful they would get in. The first 100 patrons -- some of whom said they had arrived at 3:45 a.m. -- were admitted to the theater and surrendered their cellphones to theater staffers and submitted to brief security checks. 
PHOTOS: Summer Sneaks 2013
The screening was set to begin at 10 a.m., but 15 minutes after that time, there were still empty seats in the auditorium. That's when a frenzied usher began yelling at the audience to stay calm, alerting everyone that fans outside were rushing the theater. He said the police had been called, and requested any staffers go outside to help him deal with the masses.
Still, it was unclear how serious the threat was. Many in the crowd began laughing. Was this some sort of prank? Were Niall Horan, Zayn Malik, Liam Payne, Louis Tomlinson and Harry Styles actually about to surprise the audience? (Sadly, no.)
Shortly after the usher's warning, a trailer for "The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones" began to roll and the crowd settled into their seats. Meanwhile, chaos was unfolding just ver futbol en vivo outside the theater doors.
Just as Lizette Van Patten, her 13-year-old daughter and a 14-year-old friend were about to enter the theater, hundreds of mostly young female fans who had been turned away burst through the theater entrance.
“They charged and went straight past the ticket takers for the doors of the actual theater screaming, ‘Let us in! Let us in!’” recalled the 40-year-old San Pedro resident. “It took about a half an hour before a police car came with two policemen in it. They started palming kids down and shoving them outside.”
PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times

A Los Angeles Police Department spokesman did not immediately return a request for comment.

Allysa Mae De Guzman, 16, was part of the mob. She said that when she and her friends were told they wouldn’t be able to see the movie, they all began running toward the theater anyway.
“When I got inside, the red ropes that block the entrance to the theater were on the floor,” she said. “It was pretty scary because people were tripping on the floor and pushing and stuff like that.”
Van Patten said her daughter was so upset she didn’t get to see the movie that she left the Grove with mascara casas de apuestas streaks running down her face.
“I’ve been to plenty of premieres and have seen people go crazy over Johnny Depp and Tom Cruise,” she said. “But nothing like this. Now I’m really convinced that One Direction is like the Beatles of this generation.”

ALSO:
One Direction 'skis' and 'surfs' in goofy 'Kiss You' video

5 things we learned from One Direction's 'Best Song Ever' video

One Direction's 'Best Song Ever' video: 22 million views in two days

amy.kaufman@latimes.com

PHOTOS AND MORE

VIDEO: Upcoming summer films

VIDEO: Upcoming summer films

The Envelope

ENVELOPE: The latest awards buzz

NC-17 movies

PHOTOS: Greatest box office flops


Copyright © 2013, Los Angeles Times
Self esteem can prevent girls like this from losing control. 
Apparently these dumb giurls don't realize these dudes are gay. 
Er, is this one of those "bands" concocted by some cigar-chomping fatty in Florida? Do they play instruments? Have they been appearing in small clubs for several years, developing their musicianship, their act?? Do they write their own songs? Just askin'.
Every show. Every game. Every ticket.
Be the first on your street to see the show.
Share your summer travel photos. We'll publish the best in print and online. 2012 highlights



Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros make honest music

Alex Ebert is the leader of the band Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros. (Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times / August 3, 2013)
August 3, 2013, 6:30 a.m.
The members of Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros think pop music might be headed into a new phase, one in which the calculated cynicism and ironic detachment prevalent in recent years starts giving way to good old-fashioned sincerity.
Honestly.
"The term 'post-ironic' has been thrown around, and I may or may not have helped to have a hand in inventing it," said the band's singer and chief songwriter, Alex Ebert, who did invent the alter ego of Edward Sharpe as the namesake for the band he and several friends started in Los Angeles six years ago after his stint in Ima Robot.
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"The interesting thing is that if you come right out as [B.S.], no one questions you doing [B.S.]," Ebert, 35, said. "No one says Lady Gaga's not for real, because she's obviously not for real. No one's going to attack the veracity of Lady Gaga today, or anyone really....
"But if you try and approach something with a post-ironic or post-sarcastic sense, with a sense.

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of earnestness, suddenly you have to be vetted and picked apart. Whereas if you presented yourself dishonestly, sarcastically or ironically, it's all good; no one's going to question who you are. It's a very interesting, highly ironic situation."
Irony and sarcasm are in short supply on the group's third album, "Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros," which came out July 23. Instead, Ebert and the nearly dozen other members of this hard-to-categorize collective pour themselves into unapologetic expressions of love, peace, the quest for transcendent experience and other remnants of the hippie era.
Those are topics the group has been flirting with since its 2009 debut album, "Up From Below," with its hit "Home," and, especially, the 2012 sophomore effort "Here." Those albums established the band as one of the leading lights of a new, uplifting strain of indie rock, which the Zeros inject with punchy horn parts, soaring vocal choruses and clashing percussion effects often adorned in a Phil Spector-esque wall of sound.
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England's breakthrough roots band Mumford & Sons signed the Magnetic Zeros to the group's fledgling Community Music/Vagrant Records label and led to Mumford inviting Sharpe out as its opening act on recent dates in Europe, with more ahead on Mumford's U.S. tour later this year.
Singer Jade Castrinos, who got the ball rolling on the Magnetic Zeros when she and Ebert met in 2007 at Little Pedro's restaurant in downtown L.A., says there's enough music to make people feel lousy. "I don't really want to do that. I guess we're doing our thing. Like Mumford & Sons — being at their concerts and getting to play with them, that's so amazing. It makes me cry when I watch them and see 65,000 people singing a song together."
On its own, Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros will headline a homecoming show Sunday at the Hollywood Bowl, something the band members also view with almost giddy anticipation.
Joyful sentiments abound on the new album, gaining power by working in tandem with expressions of genuine anguish and despair. It's with utter sincerity that Ebert wrote and sings songs such as "Life Is Hard," "Better Days" and "If I Were Free" this time around.
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"The main thing I'm grappling with," the L.A. native said between sessions tinkering with mixes of several tracks at a Hollywood recording studio, "is sort of impulse versus reflection."
The latter quality comes across in the long pauses Ebert takes between statements, creating the impression of an exceptionally thoughtful man who constantly searches feelings in the moment on a given topic or question.
"What I mean by that is: Do I follow my present instinct to want to reach an ecstatic state — despite the fact that that current drive may drive the song right off the cliff and distort it?
"Or do I pull back and think about it from a calmer, timeless perspective: What will I enjoy more when I have wearier ears and I'm relaxing at home and I'm hanging out with my grandkids?" said the man who grew up in the San Fernando Valley and had his passion for communal music-making ignited by an elementary school music teacher from South Africa.
"It's an interesting dilemma," he said.
As the new album was shaping up, "let's go for it" seemed to be winning out. Its predecessor, "Here," was a more measured mix of ethereally beautiful explorations into transcendence, and while "Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros" also strives for a higher experience, it's one that hews closer to the vitality of the band's electrifying live performances.
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In a sense, it's the old tug between the spiritual and the temporal that artists have grappled with through the ages. Ebert engages in that tussle in the indie-rock arena with a musical attitude that also splits the difference between the boundaries of pop song structure that he greatly admires and the freedom of an expository jam-band mind-set.
It also surfaces in Ebert's invention of the Edward Sharpe alter ego, whom he has described as "a messianic figure sent down to Earth to kinda heal and save mankind but who kept getting distracted by girls and falling in love." Ebert himself reinforces the persona of a messianic figure with his wildly unkempt hair and beard, and a penchant for ditching his shoes and working barefoot in the studio.
He comes across more pixieishly playful than ominously intense, but in the recording of "They Were Wrong," Ebert opted for a deep, Johnny Cash/Leonard Cohen-like voice to express his yearning to clutch tightly to hope even in the face of sickness, pain or death.
He and his bandmates have mustered the audacity in the post-authentic age to sing, in the new album's song "Peace": "Joy, joy is the giving, give to everybody, joy, joy."
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Such unmodulated emotion does leave Ebert and his bandmates open to criticism from those who still live in the post-authentic world.
"In particular there was a review of the first album that came out way after the album was released," Ebert said. "It didn't review the album really, it only reviewed me, saying, 'He was in Ima Robot and now he's doing this and it's [B.S.].'"
Magnetic Zeros guitarist Christian Letts wants nothing to do with that attitude.
"I've been in other bands where you don't smile because it's not cool," he said. "I think these [positive] emotions are really contagious. I see what happens at our shows — people are smiling, they're having a good time; other people are crying, and it makes you feel like what you're doing really matters. It's beautifully contagious, it spreads fast through the room. I'd like to see it spread as big as it can. It's great to spread that message."
randy.lewis@latimes.com
Twitter: @RandyLewis2
-----------------------------
Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros
Where: Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., Los Angeles
When: 7 p.m. Sun.
Cost: $21.50 to $54.50
Information: http://www.ticketmaster.com or (323) 850-2000

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The name of the song from the new album is "Please!", not "Peace".
Every show. Every game. Every ticket.
Be the first on your street to see the show.
Share your summer travel photos. We'll publish the best in print and online. 2012 highlights



From Cobain to KISS: Remembering the Forum


August 2, 2013, 4:46 p.m.
Share your memories, see archival reviews and revisit the Forum's glory days.
Kurt Cobain of the rock band Nirvana in concert at the Forum in Inglewood, Calif., Dec. 30, 1993. (Larry Davis / Los Angeles Times ) More photos
August 2, 2013
As part of The Times' coverage on plans for the Forum's comeback as a concert venue, we asked readers to contribute memories of their experiences at the storied Inglewood building. Check out some of what they've written -- lightly edited for length and clarity -- plus concert photos and reviews by The Times. And add your own memories here, and see even more archival Forum reviews here.

I remember seeing Nirvana there with Chokebore as the opener. I will never forget it! It was my first big arena-style show and I was blown away with how big everything seemed to be. Now I work in the industry, but that was where I got the taste to do lighting for big shows.
— Mike Davidson, Santa Barbara
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I saw my first concert at the Forum, Neil Young, 1972 or '73. I was 14 or 15, living in Glendale; went with my best friend and another friend who was old enough to drive. It was Neil Young, a guitar, a harmonica, and a piano. That's it. He was incredible, audience captivated. Sounds cliche, but during the quiet parts, you could have heard a pin drop in that huge arena. I was only a kid, but I'd been listening to underground radio since I was 12; I knew it was something special.
— Anna Brooks, Santa Cruz


Read the review: 'Young returns, enigmatically' By Robert Hilburn Photo: Neil Young in concert at the Inglewood Forum October 24, 1978. (Dave Gatley / Los Angeles Times)

I saw Neil Young and Crazy Horse at the Forum in the late 1970s. Loudest band I ever heard, the acoustics in that cavern were horrendous. Bad reverberation is always a hallmark of rock music in an arena like the Forum. See your favorite band at Gibson Universal, the Greek, or Hollywood Bowl instead.
— Richard Hubbard, Orange

My brother and I grew up going to concerts and, of course, the Lakers at the Forum. Sometimes we would sneak in through the bottom entrance with the touring buses and limos. The list included Earth, Wind & Fire, Sly & the Family Stone, and Parliament Funkadelic. The thing we always talk about and remember the most is, when the lights went off, the "aroma" would immediately change inside. Being two little young guys, that confused us at the time. The sound inside was incomparable!
— David Johnson, Los Angeles


Read the review: 'Room at the top for E.W.F.' By Dennis Hunt Photo: Earth Wind & Fire in concert at the Forum in December 1981. (Tony Barnard / Los Angeles Times)

I saw ZZ Top in the late 1980s at the Forum. We sat in the nosebleed seats on the edge of the building and ZZ Top looked like ants. It could have been anybody down their since we could not see them and the acoustics were dreadful.
— Jeff McKinley, Perris, Calif.


My first concert, August 1977 (don't remember the exact date), KISS and Cheap Trick. I was 9 years old and went with my brother, my parents, my cousin and his wife, and my best friend and his mom. We had dinner at the Sizzler across the street before the concert. I think my friend and my brother and I were the only kids not in makeup. (My parents were cool enough to take us to the concert but not cool enough to let us wear makeup. Still trying to figure that one out!) We were on the floor about halfway back from the stage. When the live album came out later we looked at the crowd shot on the back to see if we were in it. No such luck.
— Jeff, San Francisco


Read the review:'Kiss to build a dream on' By Robert Hilburn. Photo: Gene Simmons performs at the Forum in 1977. (Los Angeles Times)

Summer of 1986, the impotent new version of Van Halen stumbled onto the Forum stage. By-the-numbers Sammy Hagar and Eddie VH with his new haircut and sappy keyboard hooks absolutely disappointed my 19-year-old, guitar-obsessed self. To the rescue later that year was (then) former Van Halen frontman David Lee Roth with arguably one of the greatest rock and roll bands ever assembled. It was loud, over-the-top and [freaking] fabulous! I witnessed Steve Vai stealing the guitar throne from Eddie Van Halen that night.
— Hoops McCann, Covina


Neil Diamond in the '90s. But with the loss of the Universal Amphitheatre, there is definitely a place for the Forum. Welcome back!
— Larry Weisberg, Pasadena


In '76 or '77 saw Rod Stewart there on his "Blondes Have More Fun" tour. My La Canada high school sweetheart and I had a blast. A lot of non-blonds showed up sporting blond wigs, or dyed their hair blond. Mine was already almost white blond, since I surfed everyday. The music was good too. Rod was awesome. Sounded as good on stage as he did on his albums.
— Mike Coleman, Monterey


Read the review: 'Fans jam Forum for Elvis' By Robert Hilburn Photo: Elvis Presley in concert at the Forum in Inglewood on Nov. 14, 1970. (Harry Chase / Los Angeles Times)

Black Sabbath with Ozzy [Osbourne] and Grand Funk Railroad, February 1971. Black Sabbath opened and were amazing, but then Grand Funk came out and, surprisingly, blew them off the stage. I didn't have my own car then, and I recall that five of us squeezed into a friend's red Subaru 360, and slowly made our way up the 405 from Huntington Beach. We took the wrong exit and got lost in Inglewood or Lennox (not sure because we were lost). I remember the strange looks we received from those we asked for directions. After the show, I got separated from my group, including the girl I had asked to go with me. I ended up hitchhiking back to HB and got home about 2 a.m. All in all a great evening, with the exception of getting separated from my date.
— John Lai, Camarillo


I saw Diana Ross, when she introduced the Jackson Five! Who knew those five boys would make entertainment history. We couldn't find our car afterward, for more than an hour, and finally we realized that it was parked in the lot across the street! I also have enjoyed Kurt Carr and Israel [Houghton]. Bootsy Collins' concert was the best and most extraordinary, back in the day. I was so proud to be the "big sister," and I took my younger brother to that concert. I'll never forget how they used a big screen and a toilet flushing as part of the opening. It was incredible.
— Lynne Thomas-Perkins, Victorville


Prince, 1985, Purple Rain tour with Sheila E. Amazing! It was my first concert, and I've never forgotten it, even though we were in the nosebleed section. I still have the ticket stub somewhere (or at least a scan image of it). Someone offered to buy it even though it's falling apart.
— Jorge Hernanadez, New York, N.Y.


Read the review: 'For Prince concert, it's a reign of rock' By Richard Cromelin Photo: Prince performs at the Forum on March 29, 1983. (Lori Shepler / Los Angeles Times)

I lived on Manchester, so you could say my beloved Forum was my home away from home. I remember almost getting hit by soccer balls that were kicked from the stage by Rod Stewart & the Faces at the end of their performance. I still have the rose petals tossed by the hands of Jagger that I caught when I sat in the front row. I remember hanging out with the Aerosmith groupies behind the Forum at that sold-out show, hoping I could get in under cover of groupies, but I got spotted by the roadies at the last minute. I saw the very first so-called "supergroup," Blind Faith, at the Forum. I remember a friend and I begging a roadie at the Doors concert for an empty Coors beer can that Jim Morrison had drank from. He wouldn't give it to us.
— Steve Toth, San Diego


Saw Springsteen and other legends, but stopped going to the Forum because of the inadequate women's facilities. The renovation MUST include upgrading of women's facilities to even have a remote chance of wooing me back. Heck, the Forum was so bad a group of us gals got so desperate we stormed one of the men's restrooms for relief, had a whole lookout system and routine going at one point with our boyfriends and hubbies so we all wouldn't miss so much of the show. Funny how I remember that more than who we saw there.
— Kathleen Clark, Pasadena

Read the review: 'Springsteen, the class of the field' By Robert Hilburn Photo: Bruce Springsteen drops to the floor during his July 5, 1978 concert at the Forum. (George Rose / Los Angeles Times)


Read the review: 'Springsteen, the class of the field' By Robert Hilburn Photo: Bruce Springsteen drops to the floor during his July 5, 1978 concert at the Forum. (George Rose / Los Angeles Times)

Van Halen, the Scorpions, Motley Crue, Bon Jovi -- all the best '80s metal played the Forum.
— Rick Bredlau, Houston, Texas


First concert I went to at the Forum was Cream in 1968 -- we got what we thought were good tickets (I think they were $6), but the seats ended up being on the opposite side of the Forum and the band felt very far away. Still an awesome concert. My favorite all-time concert anywhere was Jimi Hendrix in 1970. This time we got seats pretty close up and being able to watch and hear Hendrix and his band play their hearts out is sealed in my memory forever.
— Michael Brown, Santa Barbara


Bob Dylan and The Band, February 1974. The last show of the tour. We had ninth-row seats thanks to my friend's brother. No yellow-jacketed security or barriers back then, so I was right against the stage, with Dylan standing above me singing "Like a Rolling Stone." Every time he sang the chorus, the house lights went on, and I saw 18,000 people singing along. Unforgettable.
— Paul Liebeskind, Tarzana


Read the review: 'Dylan saves the best for last' By Robert Hilburn Photo: Bob Dylan performs at the Forum on Feb. 2, 1974. (Marianna Diamos / Los Angeles times)

I love the Forum. Jethro Tull, Dylan & the Band, New Barbarians, Elton John, Bob Seeger, Wings and more. The most memorable was Springsteen & E Street in '78 for the "Darkness" tour. Opening with "Spirit in the Night," Bruce climbed up to the top level while singing. He was surrounded by fans and when security tried to pull them off, the Boss said, "It's cool, man. These are my friends." He turned that place into a small club and rocked for hours.
— Rob Lawson, Glendale


I saw the Rolling Stones play there March 6, 2006, long after Staples was open. I particularly remember it because I had seats very close to the stage, and because the opening act, Queens of the Stone Age, was a piece of crap in my opinion.
— Ben Kalb


Read the review: 'The Rolling Stones rock for charity' By Robert Hilburn, Jan. 20, 1973 Photo: Mick Jagger of the Rolling.

The charge is a tracer of the prospective revenue to a bet. There are various kinds of charges:


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• American Fee: A charge that could be expressed as constructive or unfavorable number (eg -200 or 200).

Stones performs at the Forum during a July 11, 1975 concert. (Los Angeles Times)

The first concert I ever saw was at the Forum -- the Eagles Greatest Hits Tour. I was in junior high then and returned several times for many other concerts when I was in high school, including the Eagles' "Hotel California" tour. It is so meaningful to me, knowing that the Eagles will be re-opening the newly renovated Forum. Bravo!
— Yvonne Carlson Bell, Pasadena


Went with a few college friends to an Eagles concert in the spring of 1980. Roy Orbison was one of the opening acts. I guess he was making a comeback, as many of us weren't familiar with him at that time. His performance was stunningly good. What a fabulous voice. The Eagles put on a great show but Roy Orbison alone was worth the price of the ticket.
— Andrew Robbins, La Jolla


Read the review: 'Best of Eagles at the Forum' By Robert Hilburn Photo: Glenn Frey performs with the Eagles at the Forum, March 1980. (Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times)

It's fitting that the Eagles will be the first band to play at the new Forum. They were the first band I saw there back during "Hotel California." I saw many more great shows over the years, including Queen, Led Zeppelin, Aerosmith, Yes, Genesis and the Who. After making that list, it's like a best of the 1970s arena rock.
— Mike Lew Lamar, Felton, Calif.


I saw Depeche Mode perform at the Forum in 1986. Black was the primary fashion choice for concert attendees. The performance was electric ... literally, and all left satisfied. I went with my boyfriend Steve. He was more the Michael McDonald type, but he embraced the experience and we were better for it. Later I had to go hear Patti LaBelle at the Hollywood Bowl for him. The things we do for love!
— Chris Becker, Los Angeles


As high schoolers, my friend and I drove from Taft to see Jimi Hendrix in 1969. A band we'd never heard of called the Chicago Transit Authority opened. Great show, Jimi was at his best. Upon leaving the show, we realized we had no idea where we parked. So we waited for about an hour and a half while the lot cleared and there were only a few cars left, one of them ours!
Bob Beyn, Sacramento

Read the review: 'Zeppelin vies for rock legacy' By Robert Hilburn Photo: Guitarist Jimmy Page of the rock band Led Zeppelin performs at the Forum, June 26, 1977. (Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Images)

May 16-17, 1995. Jimmy Page and Robert Plant. I remember when “Song Remains the Same” came on, I jumped out of my chair, ripped off my shirt, sang and danced along. Don’t know why -- it just made me do it.
— Brian Murphy, San Diego


2/10/75 Jethro Tull, The Forum, Inglewood, CA: My little league baseball coach was a huge rock music fan. From our conversations, he knew that I was really curious about live music, yet hadn’t experienced it yet. Coach became my rock 'n' roll mentor by taking me to my first concert. Our seats were on the floor in the 30th row; close enough to see the stage antics of Ian Anderson, the strangely attired singer. His outfit looked medieval, complete with codpiece. Ian performed outrageously, and played his flute as a lead instrument, rather than background. For reasons unknown to me then, and even now, he stood on one leg quite a bit. But regardless of his theatrics, the band behind him rocked hard. Coach discreetly smoked something, and it didn’t smell like tobacco. In fact, it didn’t smell like much at all. He didn’t pass any my way, but I didn’t mind. The whole sound and vision package was enough.
— Milo Perichitch, Los Angeles


I remember seeing MC Hammer and TLC at the Forum. Hammer had like 263 fog machines, but it was awesome.
— Karim Akbar, Los Angeles


Read the review: 'Smells like rock classics' By Robert Hilburn Photo: Kurt Cobain of the rock band Nirvana in concert at the Forum in Inglewood, Calif., Dec. 30, 1993. (Larry Davis / Los Angeles Times)

I think my favorite Forum concert had to be Paul McCartney, back in '89, when he and Linda toured again for the first time since "Wings Over America." We were about halfway back in the loge seats, and I remember the blast of heat from the flashpots during "Live and Let Die." It was also the concert tour when Paul chose to return to his Beatles roots and do a lot of the songs that I only got to see on "The Ed Sullivan Show." Great night.
— Beth Rayburn, Fullerton


I saw U2 play at the Forum on the "Joshua Tree" tour. Our seats were off to the side and behind the stage, but they were only a few rows back. But the Forum has always been somewhat "in the round" and Bono came over to the back of the stage to show those fans some love. And there he was just 10 feet away, Bono signing "Sunday Bloody Sunday" on the original "Joshua Tree" tour. I was 18 and it was just an unforgettable moment.
— Christopher Jones, Los Angeles


The Eagles will kick off the Forum's fresh look in January in a multimillion-dollar effort to entice music acts to Inglewood.
A multimillion-dollar revitalization of the Forum in Inglewood includes restoring the building's Roman-inspired columns and repainting the metal panels "California sunset red."
It’s entirely possible that the Forum arena in Inglewood narrowly escaped the wrecking ball only because of a segment on CBS’ newsmagazine "60 Minutes."
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Copyright © 2013, Los Angeles Times
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Los Angeles' EDM explosion powers its move toward dance dominance

Fans at the 2012 Hard Summer music festival in apuestas deportivas front of the stage during Nero's performance. (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times / August 4, 2012)
August 2, 2013, 6:00 a.m.
It's arguably never been a better time to be a dance music fan — or in the dance music business — in Los Angeles than right now.
The annual Hard Summer festival this weekend will draw an estimated 70,000 electronic music fans over two days to L.A. State Historic Park in Chinatown, with major acts such as Justice, Dog Blood and Knife Party. Alongside it, the city is experiencing a surge in new, EDM-focused nightclubs. At least six major venues have opened or revamped in the Hollywood and downtown areas in the last two years, including the 1,700-capacity Exchange L.A. along with Create, Sound, Lure, Greystone Manor and A.V.
They join a field of established clubs like Avalon, smaller dance-focused bars like Pattern Bar and roving parties like A Club Called Rhonda, and a galaxy of semi-legal warehouse parties along downtown's fringes. In addition, L.A. arenas and festivals such as Coachella are increasingly finding that dance acts are filling their floors, and in the last year Live Nation has invested in or acquired L.A.'s two largest independent dance promoters, Hard Events and Insomniac.
Rarely has so much seed money, talent, and interest coalesced around a single genre the way that Southern California has embraced electronic dance music in the past few years. In both sheer numbers and quality, L.A. is finally equaling U.S. cities like New York and Miami, and it has the momentum to eventually become a world-class dance music tourism city.
PHOTOS: Hard Summer music festival 2012
"L.A. has such huge potential as a destination for dance music," said Rob Vinokur, co-owner of Sound (which made Rolling Stone's list of America's 10 apuestas online best dance clubs) and nearby venue Playhouse. "I've lived in every major cosmopolitan city in the U.S., and we almost have it here."
But not far away in Las Vegas there's also talk of a dance music bubble bursting, after the $100-million club Hakkasan and Cirque du Soleil's EDM venue Light entered into an already crowded and expensive field. L.A. also faces particular transportation and regulation challenges in growing its night life scenes.
At this juncture, it's worth asking — what's the right path to a sustainable dance music infrastructure in L.A.?
"I always believe that the cream rises," said Gary Richards, CEO of the promotion firm Hard Events and a DJ who performs as Destructo. "Last year we almost doubled, and we could have sold 10,000 more tickets to this year's Hard Summer if we'd wanted to. But there are too many people just milking this stuff. My interest is just in making everything work better."
PHOTOS: Hard Summer music festival 2011
The world's great dance music cities all share certain traits. There's a mix of must-see nightclubs (like Berlin's Berghain or London's Fabric) and marquee festivals (Miami's Ultra Music Festival.

The sports betting techniques are situations utilised by gamblers, which is a mixture of psychological, motivational, biological, and so on. previous performances. An instance of a tactic employing situational and biological variables is to bet on the reduced divisions and think about the distance in kilometers amongst two teams enjoying, taking into consideration prolonged trips tend to be hazardous to these reduced division teams. Other strategies seek productive use of readily available statistics, in order to boost profits. The worth approach compares probabilities (percentages) of the results with the current odds a bookmaker. Decimal probability can be basically converted into percentage by dividing a single by the probability (for illustration, 1 / 1.five = .666 => 67%). For illustration, if a get together Zaragoza - Celtic has a probability of 74%, the charge is one.75 for Zaragoza (one: one.75 = .571 => 57%), this gives a big difference of 74% - 57% = 17%. This 17% lse comes into perform according to the Kelly strategy: price range multiplied by one/ten of the estimated values ​​(in this case 17%, ie, .17) divided by the odds minus 1 (ie in this situation from one.75 to 1 = .75).

or Electric Daisy Carnival in Las Vegas) that set a global agenda and draw hundreds of thousands of fans.
Hard Summer is rapidly becoming L.A.'s standard-bearer for the latter. After the departure of L.A.-based Insomniac's Electric Daisy Carnival to Las Vegas (after a teenager's overdose death in 2010), Richards' firm has grown to host the dominant dance music festival in L.A. His stable includes events such as Hard Summer, Hard Day of the Dead (a smaller festival held in the fall) and the EDM cruise Holy Ship, alongside a variety of club-level events across America.
Hard festivals have helped launch big new stars like Skrillex, and the firm earned a major endorsement when Live Nation acquired Hard Events in 2012 (terms of the deal have not been disclosed). Seven years after Hard Events' founding, this year's fest is the biggest installment yet.
"The key is the music, you have to be diverse and pick new things," Richards said. "Any promoter can just go book the DJ Magazine top 100 acts. People are tired of seeing all that same stuff."
PHOTOS: Concerts by The Times
Local festival-sized competitors, like comaprador de apuestas the long-running Lightning in a Bottle, are improving to compete. And a new L.A. edition of the dance-focused conference International Music Summit, held in April at Hollywood's W hotel with speakers like Ultra Records' Patrick Moxey and Shelly Finkel from promoter SFX Entertainment, offers a forum to debate the genre's business issues.
The economic effects of such festivals are real. 2012's Electric Daisy Carnival brought more than $200 million into the Las Vegas area, according to a Beacon Economics study. This year's two-week Ultra Music Festival brought an estimated $79-million worth of economic activity to Miami-Dade County — an area with one-third the population of Los Angeles County.
But to truly take on other cities for money and influence, there needs to be a year-round EDM club ecosystem that falls outside the summer festival season..
L.A. has rapidly caught up in the last two years. New clubs like Insomniac's Exchange L.A., Create (Insomniac's venture with hospitality conglomerate SBE) and SBE's Greystone Manor routinely sell out bills with the genre's top artists. Stalwarts such as Hollywood's Avalon and well-appointed upstarts like Sound and Lure keep a heady mix of mainstream fare and more adventurous artists.
 
Copyright © 2013, Los Angeles Times
In other words corporations are now milking the money to be made off kids on drugs. Like all trendy things this will die fairly quickly.
Every show. Every game. Every ticket.
Be the first on your street to see the show.
Share your summer travel photos. We'll publish the best in print and online. 2012 highlights



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